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Brown, whose real name is Inga Marchand, was driving a sport utility vehicle on Wednesday when she was stopped for talking on a handheld cell phone and 부산출장샵 failing to stop at a stop sign, police told The Record of Bergen County.

After a check showed the SUV’s registration had been suspended, the 27-year-old rapper gave officers a variation of her real name and a date of birth that was a year off, authorities said.

When a search for the name she gave turned up no records, the officers asked her again for the information, and she gave her correct name and date of birth, authorities said.

The officers then learned that Brown’s license was suspended, and she was taken to police headquarters, where she was issued seven traffic tickets and released on her own recognizance.

She was told to appear in municipal court Sept. 4 in Mahwah.

Brown’s lawyer, John L. Sampson, did not immediately respond to requests for comment by The Associated Press on Monday night.

The traffic stop came a day after Brown was arrested on suspicion of assaulting a neighbor in New York City’s Brooklyn borough.

Police said that the two women got into a fight over the rapper blasting her car stereo and that, when they passed each other on the street a few days later, Brown hurled her BlackBerry device at the woman, cutting her lip and knocking a tooth loose.

Brown is already on probation after pleading guilty to assault in a 2004 dispute over paying for a manicure.

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And yet, says Vartan, “I’m a lot more sensitive than anyone would really know, and it’s definitely interesting to portray that in a character.”

As the star of ABC’s hour-long fall dramedy “Big Shots,” the former “Alias” secret agent is just one of a number of actors playing complex, emotionally evolved, heterosexual alpha males putting their softer side on display in prime time.

In the late 1990s, “Sex and the City” ushered in a new portrait of single women with their frank discussions of their sexual exploits, desires, fantasies and beliefs about men. Of late, however, it’s the less-fair sex going sensitive.

In a number of broadcast ensembles premiering this fall, men are opening up about issues beyond sports, 대구출장샵 money, power and sexual conquests. They’re expressing their feelings — often to other men — on fatherhood, intimacy and love.

One such series is ABC’s “Carpoolers,” which centers on commuter pals who commiserate about everything from their jobs and their wives (“If we don’t provide for our women, do they really need us?” queries one character) to their personal secrets (one confesses to losing his virginity to Air Supply’s syrupy ’80s ballad “All Out of Love.”)

“The whole idea behind the car pool is that anything can be said,” says co-star T.J. Miller. “It’s almost like the huddle before they go into the football game that is life. Then they go back into the huddle because there’s another game at home. So it’s guys trying to figure stuff out and wanting to get the perspective of other guys.”

Other series featuring men bonding include HBO’s popular comedy, “Entourage,” just renewed for a fifth season and CBS’ returning “Rules of Engagement,” highlighting the friendship of three men: one married, one engaged and one happily playing the field. Then there’s the new ABC sitcom, “Cavemen,” which follows a group of modern-day Cro-Magnon men who are far more enlightened than their counterparts in the days before fire.

“There’s a bit of an evolution, the idea of male bonding, which has always been around in entertainment, but in the past it was done with a little more machismo,” says Nicole Vecchiarelli, entertainment director of Details, a men’s fashion and lifestyle magazine. “But in the post metrosexual era guys bonding isn’t necessarily about guns and action and high testosterone activity. They’re exposing their more sensitive side because that’s a reflection of the typical urban male.”

Although the idea of the metrosexual man focused on outward appearances, where men were as conscious about the way they looked — and smelled — as women, “now it seems they can, on the inside, feel a little bit more like girls and that’s still OK,” adds Vecchiarelli.

The men in “Big Shots” are very in touch with their feminine sides. Vartan, Dylan McDermott, Joshua Malina and Christopher Titus play high-powered Manhattan CEOs with everything in the world they could want, except for stable relationships at home. In the pilot, the men groan so much about their dysfunctional marriages, their need for intimacy and fidelity, McDermott’s character declares: “Men. We’re the new women.”

Series creator and executive producer Jon Harmon Feldman believes that men are now having “to deal with traditional female issues of fidelity, rejection or the challenges of love or making relationships work. We’re trying to attack those (issues) in a way that is true to how men would deal with it and hopefully bring a glimpse into men that women might not ordinarily get.”

But “Carpoolers” scribe Kit Boss argues that there has to be a line drawn on all this male camaraderie. “I just wrote an episode that answers the question: Are they friend friends or car-pool friends? In the case of that story, we definitely looked for a way to undercut anything that felt too emotional or too sensitive.”

For example, one of the characters, happy to find out that they were more than car-pool pals, goes for a hug. “The guy he was going to hug said: ‘Whoa, we’re not girlfriends. We’re friends.’ … To me, the danger would be: Does this match the reality that I know? I generally find more humor in the inability to express one’s self … than in being able to be more highly evolved as a male.”

That’s how TV has traditionally handled the topic of men and their hearts, with humor. It was the case with the father and son stories of “The Andy Griffith Show” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” workplace comedies like “Barney Miller” and “Cheers,” buddy romps like, “The Odd Couple” or the long-running “Frasier.”

“Male bonding, from whatever perspective, there’s just something silly about it,” says “Rules” star Patrick Warburton. “Personally, with me, just hanging out with my buddies playing some golf, playing some poker and, of course when I get my drink on out in the barn and I’m watching DVDs of Pearl Jam or Alice in Chains, if you’re a female it’s got to be silly — the same way, you know, that you’re a guy and you’re watching ‘Sex and the City,”‘ he says, laughing.

Generally, dramas featuring sensitive men have had a tough time garnering large audiences, female or male. HBO’s comedy “The Mind of a Married Man” (2001) only lasted a season. And of the 2006 releases: NBC’s sitcom “Four Kings,” CBS’ hour-long “Love Monkey,” and the ABC drama, “What About Brian,” all came and went.

“One of the things that I loved about Brian was that he was so much of who guys are, the modern man, a little more sensitive, a little more open about showing certain feelings,” says “What About Brian” lead Barry Watson. “I think the reason why ‘Brian’ still isn’t going on actually doesn’t have anything to do with that — at least I would hope not.”

“We still have a deep-seated need for the man being the rescuer, the man being the hero,” says Warren Farrell, author of numerous books on men, including the best-seller, “Why Men Are the Way They Are.” “We’re sending a huge mixed message to men. First we want the football player and then we blame him for being rough and insensitive with women.”

Kevin Kay, general manager and executive vice president of men’s cable network, Spike TV, contends that broadcast executives — driven by advertisers — have long been interested in courting female audiences, so shows about men need to appeal to women. “I think that for advertisers, safer, cleaner, not as risky, not as edgy, more mainstream … that tends to fall more into the category of shows that women want to watch.”

“The Sopranos,” to some extent, “is a good example of that,” says Kay. “The way Tony Soprano and his guys hung out … you see the way guys talk to guys when nobody else is around. That’s the ability of cable TV to be a little more edgy.”

“Big Shots’ ” Feldman realizes that “there’s a natural skepticism among men to embrace male characters unless you can prove to them that they are real men, which I think to men means they are not overly indulgent with their feelings. So you’re kind of walking a line. You want to write men that women find appealing and also men find appealing, which is sometimes paradoxical. That’s the challenge.”

Small Tsunami Hits Japan; Big Threat Looms

The first tsunami from the Chile quake hit Japan’s outlying islands on Sunday, but the initial waves were small, though officials warned a bigger surge of water could reach the country’s main islands.

<img src="http://image.baidu.com/search/http:%5C/%5C/www.566tx.com%5C/uploads%5C/allimg%5C/160413%5C/20-1604131014510-l.jpg" alt="城山日出峰·1011314916-景点-韩国游” style=”max-width:440px;float:left;padding:10px 10px 10px 0px;border:0px;”>Japan’s Meteorological Agency said the first tsunami to reach Japan after the magnitude 8.8 quake off Chile was recorded in the Ogasawara islands. It was just 4 inches high. There were no reports of damage.

Special Section: Earthquake in Chile

Japan put all of its eastern coastline on tsunami alert Sunday and ordered hundreds of thousands of residents in low-lying areas to seek higher ground as waves generated by an earthquake off Chile raced across the Pacific at hundreds of miles (kilometers) per hour.

It was the first such alert for Japan’s coasts in almost 20 years.

Towns along northern coasts issued evacuation orders to hundreds of thousands of residents. Japan’s national broadcaster NHK switched to emergency mode, broadcasting a map with the areas in most danger and repeatedly urging caution.

As the wave continued its expansion across the ocean, Japan’s Meteorological Agency said its tsunami alert applied to its entire Pacific coast, with the waves expected to be biggest in the north.

In Tokyo, Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirofumi Hirano told a hastily called news conference that the government has set up a crisis control task force to deal with the possible tsunami danger.

“We will do our utmost to minimize the possible tsunami damage,” Hirano said.

In Hawaii, after a day of several tide fluctuations, the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center lifted a warning threatening the Aloha State.

Towns along northern coasts issued evacuation orders to hundreds of thousands of residents, and authorities urged people close to the shore to head for higher ground.

People packed their families into cars, but there were no reports of panic or traffic jams. Fishermen secured their boats, and police officers patrolled beaches, 대구출장샵 using sirens and loudspeakers to warn people to leave the area.

Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau said Sunday morning that a tsunami could hit the island’s eastern coast. It gave no estimate on wave size but warned the public against going near the sea. The Philippines was also watching for waves.

Earlier Sunday in Tonga, where up to 50,000 people fled inland hours ahead of the tsunami, the National Disaster Office had reports of a wave up to 6.5 feet high hitting a small northern island, deputy director Mali’u Takai said.

“That wave is reported in the Vava’u outer islands,” he told The Associated Press, adding that earlier reports were that a nearly 3.5 feet wave had hit the northern group. There were no initial indications of damage.

Nine people died in Tonga last September when the Samoa tsunami slammed the small northern island of Niuatoputapu, wiping out half of the main settlement.

More coverage of the earthquake in Chile

Death Toll Rises from Massive Chile QuakeTsunami Hits Hawaii, Minimal DamageChile Quake Doesn’t Compare to 1960 HorrorHawaii’s 1960 TsunamiChile Shock Released 500x Energy of Haiti QuakeQuake Witness: A Roar Like a Freight TrainObama: U.S. “Will Be There” For ChileImages From Chile Earthquake

In Samoa, where 183 people died in the tsunami five months ago, thousands of people Sunday morning remained in the hills above the coasts on the main island of Upolu, but police said there were no reports of waves or sea surges hitting the South Pacific nation.

In Fiji by midmorning Sunday, disaster management office duty officer Anthony Blake said no unusual wave activity had been reported.

“There has been no surges at all,” he told AP, but people who evacuated from coastal towns and villages should stay away from beaches for at least more six hours.

Blake said coastal evacuations had taken place on Vanua Levu, Fiji’s second biggest island, and in the Lau and Lomaiviti island groups. About a third of Fiji’s 800,000 people live in those areas, he said.

Police and emergency services are on alert for waves of between 1.9 and 7.5 feet on the northern and eastern islands of the archipelago.

In Japan, a tsunami of up to 9.8 feet was expected to hit the northern prefectures of Aomori, Iwate and Miyagi at about 1:30 p.m. local time (11:30 p.m. Eastern time). Waves of about 3.2 feet were expected in the Tokyo Bay area at about 2:30 p.m. local time, the Meteorological Agency said.

The town of Kamaishi in Iwate prefecture (state), where the major tsunami is expected, issued evacuation orders to its 14,000 coastal residents through its community radio system, urging them to go to designated community centers and other facilities, according to town official Masashi Suenaga.

The issuance of the major tsunami alert is the first for Japan since July 1993, when a tsunami triggered by a major earthquake off Japan’s northern coast killed more than 200 people on a small island of Okushiri.

Villagers living close to the Philippines’ eastern coast were advised to move to higher ground, said Renato Solidum, the chief of the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. He said a wave of about 3.2 feet high could hit early in the afternoon.

“We’re not expecting any huge tsunami so we’re just urging everybody to take precautions,” Solidum told The Associated Press.

On New Zealand’s Chatham Islands earlier Sunday, officials reported a wave measured at 6.6 feet.

Oceanographer Ken Gledhill said it was typical tsunami behavior when the sea water dropped a meter off North Island’s east coast at Gisborne then surged back.

Several hundred people in the North Island coastal cities of Gisborne and Napier were evacuated from their homes and from camp grounds, while residents in low-lying areas on South Island’s Banks Peninsula were alerted to be ready to evacuate.

In the Cook Islands the police issued an all-clear midmorning Sunday after the tsunami caused a minor tidal surge of a few centimeters.

In Australia, the Bureau of Meteorology reported a tsunami measuring 1.6 feet off Norfolk Island, about 1,000 miles northeast of Sydney.

There were no immediate reports of damage and no evacuations were ordered. A tsunami warning remained in effect by late morning Sunday for much of Australia’s east coast – from Queensland state in the north to Tasmania in the south.

“Do not go to the coast to watch the tsunami,” the Bureau of Meteorology’s alert said. “Check that your neighbors have received this advice. Boats in close should return quickly if possible. Boats in deep water should stay offshore until further advised.”

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And yet, says Vartan, “I’m a lot more sensitive than anyone would really know, and it’s definitely interesting to portray that in a character.”

As the star of ABC’s hour-long fall dramedy “Big Shots,” the former “Alias” secret agent is just one of a number of actors playing complex, emotionally evolved, heterosexual alpha males putting their softer side on display in prime time.

In the late 1990s, “Sex and the City” ushered in a new portrait of single women with their frank discussions of their sexual exploits, desires, fantasies and beliefs about men. Of late, however, it’s the less-fair sex going sensitive.

In a number of broadcast ensembles premiering this fall, men are opening up about issues beyond sports, money, power and sexual conquests. They’re expressing their feelings — often to other men — on fatherhood, intimacy and love.

One such series is ABC’s “Carpoolers,” which centers on commuter pals who commiserate about everything from their jobs and their wives (“If we don’t provide for our women, do they really need us?” queries one character) to their personal secrets (one confesses to losing his virginity to Air Supply’s syrupy ’80s ballad “All Out of Love.”)

“The whole idea behind the car pool is that anything can be said,” says co-star T.J. Miller. “It’s almost like the huddle before they go into the football game that is life. Then they go back into the huddle because there’s another game at home. So it’s guys trying to figure stuff out and wanting to get the perspective of other guys.”

Other series featuring men bonding include HBO’s popular comedy, “Entourage,” just renewed for a fifth season and CBS’ returning “Rules of Engagement,” highlighting the friendship of three men: one married, one engaged and one happily playing the field. Then there’s the new ABC sitcom, “Cavemen,” which follows a group of modern-day Cro-Magnon men who are far more enlightened than their counterparts in the days before fire.

“There’s a bit of an evolution, the idea of male bonding, which has always been around in entertainment, but in the past it was done with a little more machismo,” says Nicole Vecchiarelli, entertainment director of Details, a men’s fashion and lifestyle magazine. “But in the post metrosexual era guys bonding isn’t necessarily about guns and action and high testosterone activity. They’re exposing their more sensitive side because that’s a reflection of the typical urban male.”

Although the idea of the metrosexual man focused on outward appearances, where men were as conscious about the way they looked — and smelled — as women, “now it seems they can, on the inside, feel a little bit more like girls and that’s still OK,” adds Vecchiarelli.

The men in “Big Shots” are very in touch with their feminine sides. Vartan, Dylan McDermott, Joshua Malina and Christopher Titus play high-powered Manhattan CEOs with everything in the world they could want, except for stable relationships at home. In the pilot, the men groan so much about their dysfunctional marriages, their need for intimacy and fidelity, McDermott’s character declares: “Men. We’re the new women.”

Series creator and executive producer Jon Harmon Feldman believes that men are now having “to deal with traditional female issues of fidelity, rejection or the challenges of love or making relationships work. We’re trying to attack those (issues) in a way that is true to how men would deal with it and hopefully bring a glimpse into men that women might not ordinarily get.”

But “Carpoolers” scribe Kit Boss argues that there has to be a line drawn on all this male camaraderie. “I just wrote an episode that answers the question: Are they friend friends or car-pool friends? In the case of that story, we definitely looked for a way to undercut anything that felt too emotional or too sensitive.”

For example, one of the characters, happy to find out that they were more than car-pool pals, goes for a hug. “The guy he was going to hug said: ‘Whoa, we’re not girlfriends. We’re friends.’ … To me, the danger would be: Does this match the reality that I know? I generally find more humor in the inability to express one’s self … than in being able to be more highly evolved as a male.”

That’s how TV has traditionally handled the topic of men and 대구출장샵 their hearts, with humor. It was the case with the father and son stories of “The Andy Griffith Show” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father,” workplace comedies like “Barney Miller” and “Cheers,” buddy romps like, “The Odd Couple” or the long-running “Frasier.”

“Male bonding, from whatever perspective, there’s just something silly about it,” says “Rules” star Patrick Warburton. “Personally, with me, just hanging out with my buddies playing some golf, playing some poker and, of course when I get my drink on out in the barn and I’m watching DVDs of Pearl Jam or Alice in Chains, if you’re a female it’s got to be silly — the same way, you know, that you’re a guy and you’re watching ‘Sex and the City,”‘ he says, laughing.

Generally, dramas featuring sensitive men have had a tough time garnering large audiences, female or male. HBO’s comedy “The Mind of a Married Man” (2001) only lasted a season. And of the 2006 releases: NBC’s sitcom “Four Kings,” CBS’ hour-long “Love Monkey,” and the ABC drama, “What About Brian,” all came and went.

“One of the things that I loved about Brian was that he was so much of who guys are, the modern man, a little more sensitive, a little more open about showing certain feelings,” says “What About Brian” lead Barry Watson. “I think the reason why ‘Brian’ still isn’t going on actually doesn’t have anything to do with that — at least I would hope not.”

“We still have a deep-seated need for the man being the rescuer, the man being the hero,” says Warren Farrell, author of numerous books on men, including the best-seller, “Why Men Are the Way They Are.” “We’re sending a huge mixed message to men. First we want the football player and then we blame him for being rough and insensitive with women.”

Kevin Kay, general manager and executive vice president of men’s cable network, Spike TV, contends that broadcast executives — driven by advertisers — have long been interested in courting female audiences, so shows about men need to appeal to women. “I think that for advertisers, safer, cleaner, not as risky, not as edgy, more mainstream … that tends to fall more into the category of shows that women want to watch.”

“The Sopranos,” to some extent, “is a good example of that,” says Kay. “The way Tony Soprano and his guys hung out … you see the way guys talk to guys when nobody else is around. That’s the ability of cable TV to be a little more edgy.”

“Big Shots’ ” Feldman realizes that “there’s a natural skepticism among men to embrace male characters unless you can prove to them that they are real men, which I think to men means they are not overly indulgent with their feelings. So you’re kind of walking a line. You want to write men that women find appealing and also men find appealing, which is sometimes paradoxical. That’s the challenge.”

“People should remain calm …

(At left, a computer graphic shows the possible path of tsunami waves from an earthquake in Chile as Dr. Charles McCreery speaks on the phone at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center Saturday in Ewa Beach, Hawaii.)

From Alaska to Peru, Japan to Papua New Guinea, governments scrambled to emergency meetings and 서울출장샵 put out warnings to coastal areas while geological and maritime teams threw all hands on deck to gather information.

For the full story on Gen

Earlier this week, Odierno said the timeline for combat withdrawal could change if he sees problems with the formation of a new Iraqi government following elections next month. A series of pre-election shooting and car bombing attacks swept the country…

“I have time,” he said on his birthday, sitting in one of the private rooms at his swank Nobu Waikiki restaurant, which opened in May

4761 63 35] \'0391\' 331522 De Niro first turned 64 on Friday in Melbourne, Australia, where he attended the grand opening of his latest Nobu restaurant. Then he caught a private jet over the international date line and had another birthday Friday in Hawaii.

While many his age are thinking about retirement, 부산출장샵 the Hollywood star seems as busy as ever with his film career and Japanese restaurant chain, which is quickly expanding internationally.

“I have time,” he said on his birthday, sitting in one of the private rooms at his swank Nobu Waikiki restaurant, which opened in May.

The Nobu chain was a result of De Niro meeting Nobuyuki Matsuhisa at the chef’s first U.S. restaurant in Los Angeles more than 20 years ago.

“I thought the place was great. I told him, ‘If you ever want to open a restaurant in New York, let me know,’ ” De Niro said. “A year or two later, he called me, said, ‘I’m interested.’ ”

Nobu started as a business partnership in 1994 between De Niro, Matsuhisa, Richie Notar and Hollywood producer Meir Teper. The first restaurant opened in New York. The chain now has locations across the world, from Italy to the Bahamas.

De Niro’s latest film is “Stardust.”

Jon Stewart says he was “stunned” by Louis C.K. scandal

Former “Daily Show” host Jon Stewart opened up about his reaction to news that his friend, comedian Louis C.K., admitted to masturbating in front of women and using his influence “irresponsibly.”

On the “Today” show, 부산출장샵 when asked how he felt about the admission, Stewart said, “Stunned, I think.” 

He continued, “You give your friends the benefit of the doubt. I tried to think of it in terms of, I’ve had have friends who have compulsions and have done things — gambling drinking or drugs — and we’ve lost some of them. Some of them have died and you always find yourself at a moment of, ‘Did I miss something? Could I have done more?’ And in this situation, I think we all could have. So you feel anger at what he did to people.”

WATCH: “Stunned.” Jon Stewart talks Louis C.K. scandal with @MLauer and @savannahguthrie pic.twitter.com/fXBGz7NkEK

Stewart conceded, “Look, comedy on its best day is not a great environment for women. The idea that there was this added layer of pressure and manipulation and fear and humiliation … I think it’s a question of, we’re used to being in charge, and I think if you talk to women, they’re in a very difficult position, and you get mad at yourself, too, for laughing it off or for thinking, ‘That didn’t happen.’ And it’s hard.”

Stewart also addressed a May 2016 conversation in which he dismissed the rumors about C.K. During a podcast taping for David Axelrod’s “The Axe Files,” Stewart laughed off a question about why he hadn’t spoken up about the rumors about C.K. and said, “So the internet said Louis harassed women? … I don’t know what you’re talking about.” 

On “Today,” Stewart said, “I was like, ‘Look, I know this is very serious, but I know Louis, he’s always been a gentleman to me,’ which, again, it speaks to the blindness that I think a man has.” Stewart said that was the first he had heard of the rumors. 

More in Celebrities

The former “Daily Show” host said he hopes the explosion of sexual harassment allegations against powerful men will bring about change. 

“It’s another one of those endemic, systemic and complex problems that we all haven’t had the urgency for, certainly myself included,” he admitted.